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What I Read in April

A pretty view of the Semiahmoo marina in Blaine, WA, along the trail. You can see Mt. Baker (covered in snow) in the middle, on the far right. 


I didn't end up reading a lot of books this month. We moved, in fact, to a new city in the lower mainland. When I took a small break, I didn't realize that I'd need a number of months off before I got my blogging juice back, but I now have a lot of ideas for blog posts and I'm excited to share a lot of the photos I've been taking since then. I'm on instagram, too, and it's quickly becoming my favorite social media site.

Onward and upward to the books!

*Garlic and Sapphires by Ruth Riechl // This was a fantastic read. It's a 'foodie memoir' by one of the New York Times' food critics and it was so fun to read. Riechl used to dress up in different costumes while reviewing a restaurant, so she'd get the full feel and service given to any Joe Schmoe who came in, giving her a very unbiased opinion about what she was working on. She included not only the character-choosing side of things, but the reviews (including stars) she put out after eating at each restaurant 3-5 times. Her description of food is so impressive, as well. As a former chef, I was amazed that she knew what all the dishes--including a vast array of ethnic dishes--were, how they were prepared, and more importantly, what they were supposed to taste like. I read this with a friend as a book club choice, and it did not disappoint. Not too many recipes included, but if you like foodie memoirs, you'll savor this one. (See what I did there?)

*All Joy and No Fun: The Paradox of Modern Parenthood by Jennifer Senior // This is a cultural study book where the main premise is about how children affect the people who have them, instead of looking at how certain parenting gives children a certain outcome. It was wildly interesting, and I found myself nodding along to so much of the first two or so chapters. To be honest, that's where most of the agreement stopped. This book is heavy on the interviews, and I just had a hard time with what some of the parents are letting their kids do, or get away with, that it sort of tainted my reading. It's like the parents were in some sort of suspended adulthood themselves, wringing their hands over their inability to guide their kids. I had a hard time with the women interviewed and their inability to calmly communicate their feelings toward their spouses and children, as well. The main point? Kids are hard. Parenting can sometimes be the worst. It can also bring incredible amounts of joy and fulfillment, and satisfaction.

That's it. Two! I moved. And I also tried to read a MASSIVE FICTION book which is hard enough for me already, but I'm going to get through it. I found out it's going to be a BBC Masterpiece show and I am excited that I'll know the story beforehand.

Reading with the kids in April:

*More Stories from Grandma's Attic (#2) by Arleta Richardson // We love this series and have all four books. We'll finish up the last two after our current read aloud. I love the short chapters, the thoughtful conversation between generations, and the funny and true stories. Similar to Little House on the Prairie, without all the description and death.

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