Monday, October 31, 2016

October Titles // 2016


Ani as Queen Lucy and Lukka as High King Peter, acting out Narnia. Poor King Ed!

*Love Warrior by Glennon Doyle Melton - This is a memoir on marriage, and Doyle Melton's most recent book. I think I read this book in two sittings, it's so conversational. It starts with her younger years and through many addictions and destructive behaviors, became a mother and then endured a marital tragedy of the biggest magnitude. This story is R-A-W. It's sometimes hard to read in parts, and the reason I felt that way was because you might know someone in your life who mirrors Glennon's story and it's just heartbreaking. I don't agree with Glennon's Christian theology, but as a female author she stands on her own two feet with strength and resilience.

*Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them by J.K. Rowling - With the movie coming out I knew I had to catch up on JK Rowling's new movie coming out based on this book, I knew I had to catch up! This was a fun little 'textbook' that Harry Potter and Ron Weasley had at Hogwarts, and it's basically an alphabetically encyclopedia of Beasts in the magical world. The movie will be based on the author of the textbook, and how he came across all these beasts. It should be excellent!

*The Tales of Beedle the Bard by J. K. Rowling -  I can't believe I missed these little novelty books by Rowling but I caught up this month! This is a little rendition of non-muggle magical fairy tales and did not disappoint. Just like her Potter series, the virtuous characters come out on top. If you liked fairy tales as a kid and loved the Potter books as much as everyone else on the planet, this will probably be a fun 1-2 sitting read.

*Being Mortal by Atul Gawande - This book is very well written, researched, and anecdotal, but I read it too close to When Breath Becomes Air, which is also about the end of life stage. Mortal is about how our culture takes care of people who are elderly, facing end-of-life, or riddled with disease that needs massive medical intervention, and also the author's father facing his final days. It's very sad and real at times, but with research and human interest stories throughout that I think nearly anyone, at any stage in life, could get something out of it. If you aren't sobbing by the end you may be a robot.

*Taproot // Issue 19: Wander - I only post these magazines for two reasons. First, they are thick and without advertisements, so yes, I really am reading 100 pages of a magazine straight through. Secondly, because I want everyone who is mildly interested to know how much I love this magazine. It's quiet, it includes poetry, the most gorgeous artwork, illustrations, and photography, not to mention recipes, a kid's craft, and usually, some knitting to boot. This year's cover artist, Jessica Roux, is absolutely hitting it out of the park with the first three (I can't wait for next month's!) and I want a few of her prints for my home.

Read Aloud to Kids

*The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe by C.S. Lewis - This is my second time reading through Narnia, and this time around (the kids' first) we're going by original publication date. The kids LOVED this book (who doesn't) and have been making scene dioramas for school, which they've also enjoyed. I think it was the right choice to read them in this way, because it makes so much more sense than in the way I read them in college. This way flows much better, and immediately gives you action, great characters, and a Narnian imagination including meeting the four Pevensie children, Aslan, the White Witch, and a few other Narnian creatures that are important later on.

*Prince Caspian by C. S. Lewis - Prince Caspian was the second story to take place in Narnia with the Pevensie children, and it was mostly about their journey to help overcome the Telemarines, a group not native to Narnia. There are new characters here, and although it's not nearly as action-based as LW&W, it certainly has interesting merits, including Aslan's interactions with the children. I'm looking forward to the next installment in The Voyage of the Dawn Treader.

*Sophie Mouse: The Clover Curse (#7) by Poppy Green - This cute little series I read aloud to Ani whenever a new one comes, and we enjoyed it in two sittings. The pictures are very cute, and nearly on every page, and the story is action-based, and very kid friendly, and can be finished in one to two long sittings. We'll probably read the entire series if the library gets them all (they are published in the UK).


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